farms

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Finca Soledad - Pepe Jijon

Pepe Jijon is a unique Coffee Farmer. He is a mountaineer and avid climber who has reached the peak of Everest and every major mountain on all continents. He's also a professional DJ and has played internationally in front of large crowds - however - you can mostly find him playing music for his coffee trees from the porch of his Finca. It's for this reason his coffee tastes so spectacular... maybe!

Intag includes one of the areas with the highest biodiversity on earth[1]. It harbors numerous endangered species, including the spectacled bear and the jaguar. Intag is approximately 1800 meters above sea level and the soil is deep volcanic from the dormant Cotacachi Volcano which overlooks the canton . Parts of the Intag region are sub-tropical rainforests in the Andes. Including the Intag river, there are other rivers and streams in the mountains providing ample water for coffee processing.

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Finca Meridiano - Mario Hervas

Mario Hervas owns the 25-hectare farm called Finca Meridiano, which has 6 hectares planted with coffee. Finca Meridiano is located in the northwestern part of Pichincha Province, Ecuador, next to a small village called Meridiano. The Finca Meridano not only has the ideal conditions for growing coffee, but also has a vital water source, which greatly improves the quality of the coffee produced, and contractes the production of the variety Typica Mejorado.

Mario was an agronomist for 17 years, working with large-scale rose farms throughout Ecuador; he's now applying this knowledge to his coffee farm, and it's safe to say it's an absolute showpiece of innovation. Mario had a hard time identifying the perfect coffee varietal for his farm, and fortunately for us, he took a risk and planted the whole nine hectares with Typica Mejorado, which has an incredibly juicy and floral profile.

This varietal is also one the most culturally and genetically significant in the world; it originates from Ethiopia/Yemen and has been planted the world over. It is a highly problematic varietal to produce, as it is susceptible to all three of the serious coffee ailments - Coffee leaf rust, coffee berry disease, and nematodes. Fortunately, Mario's agronomy background means he is the perfect person to maintain such a varietal, and as you'll be able to tell, it's all been worth it.

The coffee is picked ripe and depulped/demucilaged the same day before being fermented underwater for 30 hours. The cofffee is dried on raised beds in a greenhouse for 20–24 days. Mario hopes to improve his quality even more in coming years by tweaking his drying process, and hopes to feel confident entering his lots into competitions to win awards and earn quality premiums in coming years.

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Finca Romerillos - Manuel Romero

Manuel Romero started 9 years ago selling roasted coffee, and he opened a coffee shop in Loja 7 years ago. However, it is only 3 years ago, after a cupping course where he was introduced to specialty coffee that he decided to buy a property and grow his own. At that moment, he didn’t imagine that it will change the concept he had about coffee, as well as his life.

His choice to produce coffee in Chaguarpamba, Loja was obvious, not only because it is a famous place in Loja for this crop, but because his mother was born here. He looked for the best varieties and planted Gesha, Villalobos and Catuai.

Since then, things have gone very quickly and this year, as the pinnacle, he won the first and the second place at Loja’s cup of excellence.

These last three years haven’t been easy on an everyday basis, but with love and effort he has consolidated a great work team and became known as an excellent producer in Ecuador. The most gratifying for Manuel is, without hesitation, the great friendships he has built thanks to coffee.

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Finca Clara Luz - Servio Gonzalez

The Finca Clara Luz is located in the Loja region of Ecuador, at an altitude of 1,720 meters above sea level. The farm was established in 2014 and has an area of 10 hectares, of which 6 hectares are used to grow coffee. There are 2 permanent employees, which will increase by 5 during the coffee harvesting season.

Finca Clara Luz also participated in the Ecuador 2018 Coffee Competition (also known as "Taza Dorada"), which won second place in coffee.

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Finca Chorora - Olinka Velez

Established in 2010, Finca Chorora has an excellent location, with an altitude of 1300-1500 meters, temperature of 18 °C-23 °C, good relative humidity, rich organic soil and good organic farming system. The farm is home to most of the coffee varieties on the ground and is of excellent quality.

"In the year of 2012, I´ve decided to sow around 10 different varieties of specialty coffee to understand the behavior of the coffee against diseases and types of soil. This was a great experience to structure new techniques among other 70 small coffee producers in my area.

Our vision of Specialty Coffee is to build strong and long term business relationships with our customers from around the world, to provide them with the best product among their needs. We are continuously in the research of new techniques that helps us reach our biggest goal. Our goal is to offer Coffee Roasters companies the perfect coffee cherries of the world.

Chorora´s Farm is ready to work and grow together the exquisit Specialty Coffee for you." - Olinka Velez

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Finca Lugmapata - Enrique Merino

Finca Lugmapata is owned by the Enrique Merino family. It has been growing coffee for more than 100 years. It has been planted since the grandfather of the current owner. When it passed to the second generation, the cutting inheritance was inherited. Only the father of the current owner did not sell the land and continued but started planting coffee, Enrique Merino is now the third generation. In 2018, the area of planted land has increased to 222 hectares. It is considered to be the larger coffee estate in Ecuador. It is particularly worth mentioning that in 2018, Lugma Pada Manor Won the 1st place in the 2018 Taza Dorada (Golden Cup) Ecuador Gold Cup.

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Finca San Augustin - Alfonso Villagomez

San Agustin is one of the three coffee-producing farms run by the same family, located in the “Tulipe” region, a magical and energetic area known for being occupied by The Yumbos -an ancient nomad tribe known for establishing only in very special places for agriculture or astronomic purposes- hundreds of years ago.

The Dávalos family acquired these lands 40 years ago and dedicated them for dairy purposes mostly. As time passed by, coffee started to grow naturally (from one single plant brought from Colombia in a family trip) and they noticed it had a really special flavor.

That’s why 5 years ago they decided to test the land establishing small plantations so everyone could have a little of those lovely flavors that once were roasted by grandpa in his own pan, and won the 4th place in the “Best of Quito” contest in 2017 with their first and only appearance.

The potential of this land is huge and, in the years to come, there will be more than 15 hectares producing only specialty coffee varieties.

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Finca Santa Rossa - Eduardo Romo

Eduardo Romo had crops of sugarcane and livestock and began to plant coffee because of the need to rotate production. It was a revelation.

He did not know anything about coffee, but thanks to the recent development in the area and the experience of his uncle, he planted one hectare. At the beginning, it was very difficult and it was a complicated experience. However, after a lot of work, dedication and love, little by little, he managed to produce a high quality coffee.

Today they are very happy with coffee and proud to give work to the people of La Perla.

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Finca La Tolas - Arnaud Causse

Las Tolas is an extraordinary place. The history alone is captivating. This producing region is located just a couple hours north of Quito in the department of Pichincha, a heavily forested area with epic Andean views. For the indigenous Yumbos, who based their year on a lunar calendar, Las Tolas proved to be the only valley with enough of a break in the clouds to provide a clear view of the moon. It is a sacred area with ruins still scattered across its forests.

Arnaud Causse was drawn to Las Tolas for a similar reason. Most of Northern Ecuador lacks proper levels of sunlight for optimum coffee production, but the break in the clouds in Las Tolas provides much needed light for coffee trees. The perfect amount of light, according to Arnaud. In addition to favorable sunlight, Las Tolas has outstanding altitude (1800-2100 masl), fertile soils, and receives an annual average of 1700mm of rainfall. In these conditions, under the shade of wild service trees, banana trees and mango trees, the cherries ripen slowly in an optimal environment to enhance the aromatic potential after roasting. Arnaud planted a couple dozen hectares over 10 years ago with some very exciting varietals that he brought from El Salvador: Tekisik Bourbon (my all-time favorite varietal), Caturra, and Pacamara.

Arnaud has an interesting story himself. He grew up in France in the mountains outside of Provence. After declining mandatory military service, Arnaud was shipped off to work on a Robusta plantation in Gabon, his first ever experience with coffee production. When his service was up, his interest in coffee was just taking off. Arnaud spent many years working on coffee projects in Ethiopia and Rwanda before finding himself in the Dominican Republic. From there he moved to El Salvador, then to Costa Rica, and eventually landed in Ecuador. Arnaud’s extensive agronomy experience is unique.

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Finca Piedra Grande - Olger Obando

Olger is a 46-years-old Ecuadorian coffee grower. Four years ago, while on a family outing through the quiet roads of his province of Imbabura, he discovered the wonderful world of coffee.

He started this adventure in a hidden place, surrounded by mountains, rivers and immense forests, in the community of Corazón de Guadual, and discovered the art of planting, producing and harvesting the small but powerful grain of such characteristic fragrance. He never thought that this world was so fascinating and that there was so much to discover. The best experiences from his farm are the beautiful sunsets he shares with his family, the solitude of nature, the orange tone that paints the clouds which accompanies the gentle breeze, and which is impregnated with the aroma of freshly roasted coffee in the heat of the campfire. The satisfaction resulting from the first sip of the ancestral drink is indescribable. He hopes that people experience the same elation when tasting his coffee and are conscious of the effort it represents to produce such quality. He also wishes that the world will know Piedra Grande farm – and the fruit of this biodiverse land that seeks to produce the best coffee – where his family and himself put their dreams, their effort and their love.

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Finca Maputo - Henry Gaibor

Finca Maputo is owned and operated by Henry and Verena Gaibor. They produce their coffee in La Perla, Nanegal, located in the up and coming region northwest of the Pichincha Province, close in proximity to Colombia. The area where their farms are located has a very particular microclimate; even though it’s only at 1350 masl, the unique climate produces 88+ coffee. Humidity levels are high and mist usually covers the coffee fields in the afternoons. Temperatures at night drop significantly with respect to temperatures during the day.

Henry is extremely methodical with his coffee production and is just as dedicated and passionate as he once was with his profession. Verena manages processing to maintain the exemplary coffee quality Henry has cultivated. They are doing everything right when it comes to picking, processing, and drying and have produced some of the best coffees we have tasted.

Henry, a veteran war trauma surgeon, is as precise and committed to coffee as he once was in the emergency room. Henry met Verena Blaser, a war nurse from Switzerland, in Bujumbura, Burundi while they were both volunteering for Doctors Without Borders and United Nations. They continued to work together during conflict in Maputo, Mozambique (1977-1992 Civil War). They have since retired and have dedicated their skills to producing coffee in Henry’s home country of Ecuador.

Maputo is Henry and Verena’s main farm with about 7 years in production. It is quickly growing year after year.

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Cerro Grande (Association) - Carlos Merchán (President)

In this zone, many young people who left the community are coming back, thanks to coffee. They see the potential of this crop and they wish to be part of it.

It is the highest area of Manabí for coffee production, but there are some water issues. They have to travel long distances in donkey back to look for water.

They preserve a lot of their ancestral culture and they lead very humble life. Coffee is their main source of income.

They value the mountain very much.

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Finca Arsenio - Arsenio Parrales

Arsenio is about 60 years old. He was a coffee grower when he was a child, but later he left the countryside for the city. Only a few years ago, he came back and started to produce coffee again. Despite his age, he is very keen to improve his practices, and he participates to every training and listens very carefully.

He started his project to produce specialty coffee intelligently, in a small area and slowly growing it; and now, he is including his family. Arsenio is a modest producer but his pairs really appreciate him.

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ASPROINCAM (Association) - José Vergara (President)

This zone is very special, because of its 5 different microclimates which allow to produce differentiated coffee. The community preserves its cultural heritage, and it is well known for being relax, but straightforward.

This is currently the main production zone in Manabí and there are still old indigenous Typica and Caturra.

This zone is surrounded by mountains, cascades, natural wealth, and it is renowned for its archeological heritage (the famous Valdivia ethnic group).

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29 de Junio (Association) - Leandro Barreto (President)

This area has always been a coffee zone, but the production dropped in the 90s like in all over the country. In the 2000s, little by little, the community started again planting coffee, and 29 de Junio became one of the main Associations in Manabí. It is not just about coffee, but also about environmental conservancy and culture promotion. They work hard to protect the cultural heritage and to care about the environment, as well as water and fauna. They try to influence in the local policies in order for them to put in their agenda these environmental issues and those concerning the coffee production. There is also a volcano in the zone, which implies rich volcano soil and nutrients for coffee plants.

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Finca Perdomo - Angel Orlando Perdomo

Angel is half-Indigenous, half-Italian, but his attitude is more local than Italian. When the Ministry of Agriculture started the reactivation program in 2012, he was hired as the head of the project in Manabí because of his reputation and his knowledge of the coffee production. Indeed, he has been a coffee grower since childhood. Even if now he is no longer part of the project, he was one of the pillars of its success.

Angel is very respected and loved in the area and many people visit him when in need of advice.

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Finca Santa Rosa - Galo Semblantes

In August 2001, after a long search for land, the family Semblantes Valdez decided to buy the hacienda Santa Rosa de Intag. They were attracted by its water sources, the exuberance of the vegetation, the beauty of the landscape, the river, the green valley in the middle of the mountains, the climate; and because of the quality of the people of the community.

In the early years, Galo, the father, dedicated himself to raising livestock and breeding Arabian horses. However, in his walks through his land, the presence of wild coffee bushes caught his attention. Galo’s son, Galo Andrés, returned from his studies abroad and the family decided to focus in coffee growing. A trip to Guatemala and a visit to the Finca Filadelfia with 100 hectares of coffee intensified their interest. Additionally, their hacienda was at the precise height to produce excellent quality coffee with an exquisite aroma.

In 2014, as a trial, the first 1,200 coffee plants were planted on a hillside covered with tropical cedars. They continued with another 4,000 in an esplanade next to the Río Toabunche. By 2017, 17,500 plants had been planted (10,000 of Caturra and 7,500 of Typica). Parallel to this, and because of the need for shade, plantain tress, cedars, alders –among others- were interspersed. From the outset, respect for nature and the use of local labor force were the mystique that accompanied both planting and harvesting.

The careful and painstaking cultivation, and delicate and selective handpicking cherries- one by one - by his people, resulted in a quality coffee. Soon a true passion developed in their family. Galo took care of cultivation, his son Felipe roasted coffee with science, art, experimentation and tasting. The outcome of this long journey is a coffee with superior characteristics, like everything one does with care and respect.

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Las Terrazas del Pisque - Arnaud Causse

Las Terrazzas del Pisque, located in North of Quito is in the heart of the Tulipe coffee region. Tulipe can have destructive earthquakes, on average one every 50 years and can only produce coffee, some lavender and wine grapes. It is indeed a rather adventurous project even to a hero-farmer Arnaud Caussee to grow such champagne-tasting specialty coffee at an altitude of between 1800 and 2100 meters lying in a cloudy forest under the shade of indigenous cedars and banana trees.

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Kopakama CWS

KOPAKAMA, means the Agricultural Coffee Co-operative of Mabanza – a former county of western Rwanda. The country has been re-organised into districts, but the name lives on.

From its beginning in 1998 with just 48 members, the focus at Kopakama has always been on producing excellent quality fully-washed Arabica against the inspiring backdrop of mountains dropping down to the sparkling waters of Lake Kivu. The farmers invested their profits from coffee sales into building their micro-washing station.

Today, Kopakama has over 600 members, expertly growing and processing their coffee using two washing stations, one full-scale and one micro, and employing the skills of a trained coffee cupper. Typical plot sizes are 0.5 to 2 hectares.

Kopakama’s farmers are committed to improving their local communities. So far, they have brought in gravity-fed water to serve the community and used the Fairtrade premium to access electricity. They have also bought the co-operative’s Conference Hall. Their vision is to move together towards a more stable price and market for their coffee.

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Kinini CWS

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Kopakaki Dutgere CWS

Kopakaki has been producing coffee since 2007. It has 1,184 members within its group.

The average number of trees/farmer is around 380 on an average of 0.15 hectares. Coffee is delivered to the washing station by those farmers within walking distance and the cooperative can also send out a hired car to assist with collection when farmers need it. After arriving at the washing station, the coffee is pulped and dry-fermented for 2 days, then rinsed and soaked for another 24 hours. Wet parchment is hand-picked on covered raised beds before being moved to the drying beds.

While the group has grown from just 12 MT in 2007 to over 57 in 2014, they have remained very committed to quality and are making their plans for growth to ensure that they continue along the same path.

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Finca Chito - Karla Garcia

Karla García is an Economist, Engineer in Gastronomic Sciences, and a student at the University of Barcelona to get a Master in Supply Chain Management and Logistics. She is a true coffee enthusiast and businesswoman who seeks to enhance Ecuadorian coffee internationally. She is currently the President of Bruhwercoffee Cia. Ltda., producer of Special Ecuadorian Coffee of the Amazon and Loja; and creator of Wild Coffee, a roasted coffee brand with development projects for its farms, both in process and productivity, seeking to raise the level of Ecuadorian coffee. Karla has also various Certifications from the Specialty Coffee Association as Coffee Cupper, Coffee Roaster, Barista and Brewing, as well as the Q Arabica Grader Certification.

"How we want to change the world? For some, it’ll be traveling the globe in search of pristine green coffee, exploring other cultures and geography. For others, it’ll be connecting with customers each day, serving beautiful drinks and participating in a personal daily ritual enjoyed by millions. For all of us though, it’s in pursuit of great coffee. Our goal is to produce the finest coffee hence we have spared no expense in obtaining the most eco-friendly, and modern equipment available today. We also understand that machinery without a properly harvested cherry will not produce an excellent end product. In order for us to achieve this goal we harvest only ripe cherries. Commitment to excellence and the ability to meet our customer’s demands, we can produce Exchange grade coffees as well as Specialty Coffees. We can also process coffee to customer’s specifications. Bruhwer Coffee, striving to bring Ecuador’s finest coffee to the world. With Certifications like Organic, Kosher and Bird-friendly our Chito Farm has a added value. " - Karla Garcia, CEO Bruhwer Coffee, Finca Chito

厄瓜多尔著名咖啡生产商Wild Coffee介绍_厄瓜多尔有名的咖啡品牌

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Anferara Estate - Adola Woreda, Guji Zone - Mekurian Berhanu

Anferara Estate is located 16 km south of Adola, a growing coffee area in the east part of Guji, southern Ethiopia. Mr. Mekurian and Berhanu selected this area to grow coffee at because of the soil, altitude and the nearby Awata river. They are both second generation coffee producers, so quality is part of their nature. Their good farm practices and well-controlled processing really comes out in the coffees produced here.

The Estate is divided up into East, West, South and North plots for total size of 72 hectares. It is supplied by 800 to 900 farmers from the surrounding area.

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Wote Konga Mill - Yirgacheffe Wordea, Gedeo Zone

Wote is a private wet mill in Yirgacheffe in southern Ethiopia. The coffee is grown in the micro region Gedeo in Yigracheffe, known for having some of the most complex and intense flavours in Yirgacheffe. The cherries are then processed at Wote by the producer Mr. Makrurian Mergya and his 100 odd employees. Next to the process station the river Wote runs and is the natural water source to the process station.

The coffee is delivered to Wote Konga from about 700 smallholders in the surrounding area, as well as remote farmers, where the coffee is growing at an altitude ranging from 1850 to 2050 m.a.s.l. Mr. Mergya has spent the last years to improve the preparation and processing of the coffees to meet the quality standards of the high end coffee market. Improvements has been done to increase the knowledge in drying methods and careful sorting.

Since coffee grows in the wild in Ethiopia, improved varieties and native coffee of forest origin is transferred into the smallholder’s gardens, meaning that we find no less than 26 varieties of coffee in our cup of Wote. All varieties go under the generic Ethiopian Heirloom, in this case Yirgacheffe type.

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Banko Michicha Mill - Kercha Woreda, Guji Zone

Banko Michicha is small Kebele (Community ) located in West part of Guji. In the south of Ethiopia.

Mr Tariku comes from big family that are all in coffee. Well known as the Edma family around in Guji. Tariku is third generationcoffee grower in Guji.

Tariku choice to establish his own station in Banko Michicha because its relatively new area and there is few stations in the area.

Why Tariku believes in Banko Michicha as area for future quality coffee. The micro climate it has very good rain path, A lot of young trees together with the soil and high altitude.

Things Tariku will do in coming harvest to to further improve the quality. Cherries selection. Cherries floating (water density) and then use shade net.

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Kayon Mountain - Odo Shakiso Woreda, Guji Zone - Ismael Hassen Aredo

The Kayon Mountain Coffee Farm covers 500 hectares with about 300 hectares planted in coffee, and has been owned and operated by Ismael Hassen Aredo and his family since 2012. It is located 510 kilometers south of Addis Ababa, and the property crosses the border of two villages—Taro and Sewana—located in the Oromia region, in the Guji zone of the Shakiso district of Ethiopia.

Ismael oversees a staff of 25 permanent full-time and 300 seasonal employees, and the farm management offers free transportation services as well as financial support for building schools and administration buildings for the community. The farm competes with a nearby mining village for seasonal workers, so Ismael and his family tend to pay higher wages to their pickers in order to incentivize them returning year after year.

Kayon Mountain farm has a nursery on-site, and utilizes shade (gravilla, accacia, and other indigenous trees) to protect the coffee as well as for creating compost to fertilize naturally. Ismael is meticulous about not only the structure and management of the farm itself, but also the harvesting and processing. Both Natural and Washed lots are produced on the property.

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Koke Mill - Yirgacheffe Woreda, Gedeo Zone

The family-owned Koke washing station, which was built in 2011 and has seen many improvements since 2015, when the washing station staff began providing guidance to contributing producers regarding steps to take for increased coffee quality. The Koke station stands on the side of a hill, with coffee grown above and below the station. For the last three years, the Koke station managers have been separating out the higher elevation cherries, and the quality clearly shows. 96 small scale farmers provided cherries to Koke this harvest, most of them multigenerational family farmers.

Their many generations of experience is evident in Natural coffees that are dried on the washing station’s 106 raised beds for 21 days before resting for a month in a well-ventilated storehouse. Cherries are sorted by hand upon arrival to the washing station to remove the less dense cherries. Tarps are often used to keep the coffee from drying too quickly and losing its beautiful and characteristic cup profile. When coffee is dried inside the cherry, it is milled to removed the dried pulp and parchment at the same time. Green coffee is color sorted prior to export.

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Aricha Mill - Yirgacheffe Woreda, Gedeo Zone

This coffee comes from our washing-station partners at Aricha, which is in the kebele, or village, of Idido, in the woreda, or district, of Yirgacheffe, in the Gedeo Zone. Aricha Mill is among the microregions whose coffee is dynamic, almost tropical-tasting, with a juicy fruit base and a sugary, floral sweetness.

Aricha Mill sits only a few kilometers from the center of Yirgacheffe town, but receives coffee from over 700 growers. Much of the reason this lot is so spectacular is a result of the terroir in which it is grown. These hills sit above 1900 meters and have soil that is extremely iron rich, conditions to which the coffee plants are perfectly adapted.

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Limu Gera Mill - Gera Woreda, Jimma Zone - Faysel Abdosh

In Gera Woreda, we have partnered with the Faysel Abdosh who has been running his Washing Station since 2014. Limu Gera Mill has more than 75 percent of the coffee is grown under the shade of trees. The remaining area is comprised of infrastructure and preserved forest.

More than 100 native and leguminous shade trees are planted per hectare of land. That’s well above our shade grown certification requirements. The mill is green in more ways than one. Limu Farm practices micro-basin rainwater harvesting, applies organic compost fertilization, uses mechanical eco-pulpers and solar driers, and invests in hiring staff.

The station serves 750 smallholder producers, collecting their coffee in cherry and processing it uniformly at the mill. The coffee is first depulped and fermented underwater for 24–36 hours. Then it is washed and laid on raised beds under a shade cover to dry. The drying takes 10–12 days.

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